History of Buddhism in India

History of Buddhism in India

buddhism

History of Buddhism in India

Buddhist is an Indian religious tradition based on the Buddhist texts written by Buddha. It originated in India sometime between the sixth and 4th century CE, spreading to much of Asia. Buddhism differs from Hinduism in that it preaches non-violence and compassion, and is considered a vehicle of awakening. It uses meditation and contemplation but avoids rituals and beliefs. Its teachings can be regarded as an offshoot of Mahayana Buddhism, the other major school of Buddhism in India. However, it has diverged largely from its predecessor in many regards.

Like other religions, buddhism believes in reincarnation. Through the process of kamma, or the internalization of suffering, bodhisattvas are said to become free from rebirth. The theory of karma, or the theory of reincarnation, is central to all religions, but in buddhism it is believed to be true for all people, regardless of what s/he may have done in the past. The path to enlightenment in buddhism does not depend on attaining salvation at the expense of others; rather, salvation and happiness are achieved through the practice of dharana (meditation), pranayama (breath regulation), and samadhi (meditative absorption). By meditating, kami (goodness) is said to be awakened, which brings kundalini energy to the mind and body, resulting in enlightened thought and a path of enlightenment.

Because the goal of buddhism is the cultivation of bodhi or the spiritual realm, all followers of the Buddhist faith are expected to practice meditation and contemplation to a high degree. The three primary methods of achieving this are jnana (practice meditation to gain knowledge and insight), mokarana (concentration), and samadhi (absorption). In contemporary society, people in the western world are prohibited from using tobacco products due to the high mortality rate, and as a result, many people choose to abstain from smoking in order to remain healthy. However, in Buddhist teachings, all living beings are bodhisattvas, and the practice of jnana and mokarana are considered very important because the path to both depends on these two aspects.