Judaic Christianity

Judaic Christianity

judaism

Judaic Christianity

Judaism is an Abrahamic, polytheistic, and historically-religious faith consisting of the broad communal, cultural, legal, and religious tradition and culture of the Jewish community. The term “jewish” in Judaic is derived from a combination of two words: “kaddish” meaning “judgment” and “nu-zadda,” meaning “attendance.” Judaism is regarded by many religious Jews as the literal expression of God’s promise to the Children of Israel, as revealed in the books of the Torah. It is also considered the religion of the Jewish people, who are considered to be God’s chosen people. According to the teachings of the Torah, God commanded the existence of Jewish law (Kaddish), that Jews must observe in order to keep God’s promise and guarantee. All these laws, ethics, and rituals, are all collectively referred to as Judaic Judicatin, which consists of both religious and civil obligations.

In addition to the general membership in the Judaic covenant, the primary means of communication for the Jews was the temple, which served as the communal center of Judaic life. The Temple, together with its rites and customs, served as the communal way of life of the Judaic people. The concept of Judaic ritualism emphasizes the importance of being a member of a covenant community. The temple offered the common place where all commitments were formalized, sealed, and committed.

While there are major differences between Judaic and other traditional Christian denominations, there are also similarities. Both embrace a strong sense of exclusivity, which prohibits inter-communication with non-jews. While there is no biblical justification for Judaic exclusivity, the exclusivity of Judaic theology can be observed in their use of the bible, which they believe contains the will of God. The use of the bible in liturgy and daily prayer, their rejection of ecumenism, practices surrounding the Shastras, ritualistic nature of their worship, and the teaching that the bible is the written word of God. In essence, they are a religious movement whose origins have roots in the early Jewish communities but which has developed and strengthened through time, moving from a largely rebellious movement against Rome to an intensely focused expression of faith rooted in the teachings of the Holy Bible.